Call for Papers | Applications - Part 52

posted by PP on 2005/12/26 02:16

[ Call for Papers | Applications ]

The Russian, East European and Eurasian Center, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, announces two summer training workshops for junior scholars as part of the 2006 Summer Research Laboratory.
  1. Balkan Studies Training Workshop for Junior Scholars Building Balkan Studies: Integrating Multidisciplinary Perspectives (June 20-22, 2006)
  2. Russian-Jewish Studies Training Workshop for Junior Scholars From the Pale to Moscow: Russian-Jewish and Soviet-Yiddish Studies (June 12-16, 2006)
1. Building Balkan Studies: Integrating Multidisciplinary Perspectives (Moderator: Gerald Creed, Professor of Anthropology, CUNY)

Workshop Goals and Themes
The workshop is part of the Summer Research Lab. The central aim of this three-day workshop is to bring together doctoral students and junior faculty who focus on the modern Balkans in various disciplines to discuss their work and issues in the field. Although massive political change and the Yugoslav wars regularly put the region on the front page of major newspapers throughout the 1990s, Balkan studies is still a relatively underrepresented field. The workshop objectives, then, are to foster a supportive network of colleagues involved in this field and to explore recent research paradigms and resources. The workshop provides a superb forum in which to investigate a variety of pressing issues, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • state formation and democratization
  • privatization and the creation of new market economies
  • ethnopolitics and the civil rights of minorities
  • law reform, the writing of new legal codes, and rethinking
    intellectual property rights
  • human security (terrorism, trafficking of women and children, organized crime syndicates)
  • demographic movement (displaced peoples, diasporic formations, refugees, guest workers)
  • the culture of socialism and postsocialism
  • education (rewriting of curricula; establishment of new institutions for higher learning)
  • popular culture and contemporary society (entertainment industry, especially music and film)
  • the arts, social change, and postsocialist identity (literature, fine arts, architecture)
  • the changing position of Balkan states vis * vis the EU, the US, Russia, and the Middle East
  • Islam in Europe (architectural restoration, revival of Sufism, renewal of worship practices)
  • gender, especially changing roles and images of women in society.

Workshop Format
Workshop sessions will be devoted to a discussion of the participants' research; investigation of current literature and paradigms; and a presentation of scholarly resources, including relevant databases by staff specialists from the Slavic and East European Library. Time will also be available for research in the UI Library one of the largest Slavic and East European collections in the U.S. Participants may stay beyond the workshop dates to conduct individual research.




2. From the Pale to Moscow: Russian-Jewish and Soviet-Yiddish Studies (Workshop Moderators: Gennady Estraikh, Visiting Associate Professor, Jewish Studies, New York University; Harriet Murav, Professor and Head, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; David Shneer, Director, Center for Judaic Studies, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Denver)

Workshop Goals
The goal of this five-day workshop is to bring together advanced graduate students, junior faculty, and professionals who work in various disciplines on Russian-Jewish-Soviet–Yiddish studies (with a primary focus on the 20th-21st century) to discuss their research and current
issues in the field. The increase in publication in this field in recent years, the opening of new faculty positions, the discovery of new archival materials, and shifts in basic conceptual paradigms in humanities and social sciences have created new opportunities for scholarly research. However, rarely do scholars have the opportunity to exchange their ideas in a forum that is devoted exclusively to Russian-Jewish studies and brings together an array of multidisciplinary theoretical and methodological approaches to issues and questions in the
field.
This workshop will provide scholars with an opportunity to present their work on topics including, but not limited to:

  • Language in conflict: Hebrew and Yiddish in the Soviet Union; Russian as a language of Russian-Jewish culture; language policy and culture
  • Re-assessing ethnicity, nationality, religion, and citizenship as categories of analysis in Russian–Jewish studies; the viability of models of multi-linguistic, multi-ethnic identity in the Soviet and post-Soviet era
  • The contribution of current critical theory and cultural studies approaches to Russian-Jewish studies: post-colonial studies, post-socialist studies, gender, sexuality, the body, trauma
  • Historicizing the shift away from state and society approaches Approaching anti-Semitism and interethnic conflict as cultural phenomena and/or state policies
  • Holocaust studies; genocide studies
  • The cultural turn: literature and other forms of cultural production, including visual culture, film, photography, and theater; revisiting the question of socialist realism
  • Frames of reference: 1917, 1938, 1952, 1991 how the use of these dates shapes the analysis of history, culture, and identity

Workshop Format
Workshop sessions will be devoted to a discussion of the participants' research; investigation of current literature and paradigms; and a presentation of scholarly resources, including relevant databases by staff specialists from the Slavic and East European Library. Time will also be available for research in the UI Library one of the largest Slavic and East European collections in the U.S. Participants may stay beyond the workshop dates to conduct individual research.

Eligibility
The workshop is open to doctoral students and junior faculty in any discipline and professionals who specialize in Russian-Jewish issues. To be eligible for the workshop housing and travel grants, which are funded by a Title VIII grant from the State Department, participating scholars must be US citizens/permanent residents and must state the policy relevance (broadly defined) of their research in the application. Very limited housing grants are available for international scholars. Those who are not eligible for financial support may take part in the workshop at their own expense, pending space availability




To download an application form go to www.reec.uiuc.edu/srl/srl.html and click on "how to apply" in the navigation bar. To request a paper application form contact:
Summer Research Lab
Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
104 International Studies Building
910 S. Fifth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-1244; fax (217) 333-1582
reec@uiuc.edu
www.reec.uiuc.edu


Antworten

Senior Editor

Seitenwechsel. Geschichten vom Fußball. Hgg. v. Samo Kobenter u. Peter Plener. Wien: Bohmann 2008, 237 pp.
(Weitere Informationen hier)
Transcarpathica. Germanistisches Jahrbuch Rumänien 3-4/2004-2005. Hgg. v. Andrei Corbea-Hoisie u. Alexander Rubel. Bukarest/Bucuresti: Editura Paideia 2008, 336 pp.
[Die online-Fassung meines Einleitungsbeitrags "Thesen zur Bedeutung der Medien für Erinnerungen und Kulturen in Mitteleuropa" findet sich auf Kakanien revisited (Abstract / .pdf).]
Seitenweise. Was das Buch ist. Hgg. v. Thomas Eder, Samo Kobenter u. Peter Plener. Wien: Bundespressedienst 2010, 480 pp.
(Weitere Informationen hier wie da, v.a. auch do. - und die Rezension von Ursula Reber findet sich hier [.pdf].)
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